Virtual Chemistry Experiments

Chemical Equilibria

Topic Concepts Experiment
Basic Concepts The equilibrium state is describe in terms of the rate of the forward and reverse reactions for the reaction. The equilibrium constant (KP and KC) and the Law of Mass Action are introduced. A stopped-flow apparatus is used to initiate and follow the progress of a reaction using concentration-time curves.
Equilibrium Constant The equilibrium constant and its significance are discussed. The equilibrium constants for two reactions with a single gas-phase product are measured.
Reaction Table The use of a reaction table to manage equilibrium calculations is described. The equilibrium constants for two reactions are measured.
Experimental Error The impact of random errors in pressure readings on equilibrium calculations is discussed. The impact of pressure errors on the value of the equilibrium constant is explored.
Le Chatelier's Principle: Adding and Removing Reactants and/or Products Le Chatelier's Principle is introduced in the context of adding or removing reactants and/or products. The distinction between analytical amounts and equilibrium amounts of material is discussed. The equilibrium amounts of carbon, water, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen for the steam reforming reaction are measured as the analytical amounts of the various species are changed.
Le Chatelier's Principle: Temperature Changes Le Chatelier's Principle is used to predict the effect of a change in temperature on the composition of a system at equilibrium. The equilibrium amounts of carbon, water, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen for the steam reforming reaction are measured as the temperature of the system is changed.
Le Chatelier's Principle: Volume Changes Le Chatelier's Principle is used to predict the effect of a change in volume on the composition of a system at equilibrium. The equilibrium amounts of carbon, water, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen for the steam reforming reaction are measured as the volume of the system is changed.


Virtual Chemistry Home Page



© Copyright 2001,2009, 2012 David N. Blauch
Last updated Wednesday January 15 2014